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Status of Current Legislation

Legislative Update

The following is a list of bills POST is monitoring from the 2021-22 Legislative Session.  These bills could have an impact on POST operations or be of significant interest to law enforcement partners. It is not a complete list. This list updates monthly. (Updated 6/24/2022)

Bill # and Author Title and Summary Status of Bill

AB 485

(Nguyen)

Hate Crimes Reporting

Current law defines a "hate crime" as a criminal act committed, in whole or in part, because of actual or perceived characteristics of the victim, including, among other things, race, religion, disability, and sexual orientation. Current law requires the Attorney General to direct local law enforcement agencies to report information relating to hate crimes to the Department of Justice, as specified, and requires the department to post that information on a specified internet website on or before July 1 of each year. This bill would additionally require local law enforcement agencies to post the information sent to the department on their internet website on a monthly basis.

 6/13/2022-In committee: Referred to suspense file.

AB 655

(Kalra)

California Law Enforcement Accountability Reform Act

Current law requires that a candidate for a peace officer position be of good moral character, as determined by a thorough background investigation. This bill would require that background investigation to include an inquiry into whether a candidate for specified peace officer positions has engaged in membership in a hate group, participation in any hate group activity, or advocacy of public expressions of hate, as specified, and as those terms are defined. The bill would provide that certain findings would disqualify a person from employment.

6/22/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 4. Noes 0.) (June 21). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

AB 988

(Bauer-Kahan)

Mental health: 988 crisis hotline

Current federal law, the National Suicide Hotline Designation Act, designates the 3-digit telephone number “988” as the universal number within the United States for the purpose of the national suicide prevention and mental health crisis hotline system operating through the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline maintained by the Assistant Secretary for Mental Health and Substance Abuse and the Veterans Crisis Line maintained by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs. This bill would enact the Miles Hall Lifeline and Suicide Prevention Act. The bill would require the Office of Emergency Services to ensure, no later than July 16, 2022, that designated 988 centers utilize technology that allows for transfers between 988 centers as well as between 988 centers and 911 public safety answering points. The bill would require, no later than 90 days after passage of the act, the office to appoint a 988 crisis hotline system director, among other things. The bill would require, no later than July 1, 2024, the office to ensure interoperability between and across crisis and emergency response systems used throughout the state, as described. The bill would require the office to consult with specified entities on any technology requirements for 988 centers.

6/16/2022-From committee chair, with author's amendments: Amend, and re-refer to committee. Read second time, amended, and re-referred to Com. on G.O.

AB 1406

(Lackey)

Law enforcement agency policies: carrying of equipment.

Current law requires law enforcement agencies to maintain a policy on the use of force, as specified. Current law places certain restrictions on the use of force by law enforcement agencies, including prohibiting the use of a choke hold or carotid restraint. This bill would require a law enforcement agency that authorizes peace officers to carry an electroshock device, such as a taser or stun gun that is held and operated in a manner similar to a pistol, to require that device to be holstered or otherwise carried on the lateral side of the body opposite to the side that that officer’s firearm is holstered.

6/20/2022-In committee: Referred to suspense file.

AB 1597

(Waldron)

Shoplifting: increased penalties for prior crimes

 

Current law, as amended by Proposition 47, provides that a registered sex offender or a person with a prior conviction for certain serious or violent felonies, such as a sexually violent offense, who commits petty theft, is subject to imprisonment in the county jail for up to one year or in the state prison for 16 months, or 2 or 3 years. This bill would reinstate a provision of law that was repealed by Proposition 47 that provides that a person who has been convicted 3 or more times of petty theft, grand theft, or other specified crimes and who is subsequently convicted of petty theft is subject to imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year or in a county jail for 18 months or 2 or 3 years.

4/26/2022-In committee: Set, final hearing. Failed passage.

AB 1599

(Kiley)

Proposition 47: repeal

The Safe Neighborhoods and Schools Act, enacted as an initiative statute by Proposition 47, as approved by the electors at the November 4, 2014, statewide general election, made various changes relating to theft and the possession of controlled substances, including by, among other things, generally reducing the penalty for those crimes, including reducing the penalty for possession of concentrated cannabis, establishing a procedure by which individuals convicted of those crimes prior to the passage of the act may petition for resentencing under the act, and creating the crime of shoplifting. This bill would repeal the changes and additions made by Proposition 47, except those related to reducing the penalty for possession of concentrated cannabis.

4/29/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(5). (Last location was PUB. S. on 1/3/2022)

AB 1603

(Salas)

Theft: shoplifting: amount

Proposition 47 requires shoplifting, defined as entering a commercial establishment with the intent to commit larceny if the value of the property taken does not exceed $950, to be punished as a misdemeanor. Under current law, entering a commercial establishment with the intent to take property exceeding $950 is burglary, punishable as a misdemeanor or a felony. This bill would amend Proposition 47 by reducing the threshold amount for petty theft and shoplifting from $950 to $400. The bill would provide that it shall become effective only when submitted to, and approved by, the voters of California.

4/29/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(5). (Last location was PUB. S. on 1/14/2022)

AB 1604

(Holden)

The Upward Mobility Act of 2022: boards and commissions: civil service: examinations: classifications

Current law provides that it is the policy of the State of California that the composition of state boards and commissions shall be broadly reflective of the general public, including ethnic minorities and women. This bill would, except as specified, require that, on or after January 1, 2023, all state boards and commissions consisting of one or more volunteer members have at least one board member or commissioner from an underrepresented community. The bill would define the term “board member or commissioner from an underrepresented community” as an individual who self-identifies as Black, African American, Hispanic, Latino, Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American, Native Hawaiian, or Alaska Native; who self-identifies as gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender; who is a veteran, as defined; or who has a disability, as defined.

6/23/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on G.O. (Ayes 4. Noes 0.) (June 22). Re-referred to Com. on G.O.

AB 1608

(Gipson)

County officers: consolidation of offices.

Current law authorizes the board of supervisors of a county to consolidate the duties of various county offices in various combinations, including combining the duties of the sheriff and the coroner. This bill would remove the board of supervisors’ authority to combine the duties of the sheriff with the duties of the coroner. The bill would also remove the board of supervisors’ authority to combine the duties of the tax collector with the duties of the coroner.

6/22/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on PUB. S. (Ayes 4. Noes 1.) (June 22). Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.

AB 1639

(Voepel)

Firearms

Would require a police officer of the San Diego Unified Port District Harbor Police or a port warden or a port police officer of the Harbor Department of the City of Los Angeles to complete the live-fire training qualification at least twice a year instead of at least once every 6 months in order to be exempt from the prohibitions on unsafe handguns.

5/6/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(6). (Last location was A. PUB. S. on 1/20/2022)

AB 1653

(Patterson)

Property crimes: regional property crimes task force.

Current law, until January 1, 2026, requires the Department of the California Highway Patrol to coordinate with the Department of Justice to convene a regional property crimes task force to identify geographic areas experiencing increased levels of property crimes and assist local law enforcement with resources, such as personnel and equipment.This bill would specify theft of vehicle parts and accessories as a property crime for consideration by the regional property crimes task force.

6/21/2022-Read second time. Ordered to Consent Calendar.

AB 1673

(Seyarto)

California Fentanyl Abuse Task Force

Would establish the California Fentanyl Abuse Task Force to undertake various duties relating to fentanyl abuse including, among others, collecting and organizing data on the nature and extent of fentanyl abuse in California and evaluating approaches to increase public awareness of fentanyl abuse. The bill would require the task force to be chaired by the Attorney General, or their designee, and would specify the membership of the task force. The bill would require the first meeting of the task force to take place no later than March 1, 2023, and would require the task force to meet at least once every 2 months. The bill would require the task force to report its findings and recommendations to the Attorney General, the Governor, and the Legislature by July 1, 2024. The bill would repeal these provisions on January 1, 2025.

5/20/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(8). (Last location was A. APPR. SUSPENSE FILE on 5/11/2022)

AB 1733

(Quirk)

State bodies: open meetings

The Bagley-Keene Open Meeting Act, requires, with specified exceptions, that all meetings of a state body be open and public and all persons be permitted to attend any meeting of a state body. Current law requires a state body to provide notice of its meeting to any person who requests that notice in writing and to provide notice of the meeting of its internet website at least 10 days in advance of the meeting, as prescribed. Current law exempts from the 10-day notice requirement, special meetings and emergency meetings in accordance with specified provisions. Current law authorizes a state body to adjourn any regular, adjourned regular, special, or adjourned special meeting to a time and place specified in the order of adjournment, and authorizes a state body to similarly continue or recontinue any hearing being held, or noticed, or ordered to be held by a state body at any meeting. This bill would specify that a "meeting" under the act, includes a meeting held entirely by teleconference.

4/20/2022-In committee: Hearing postponed by committee.

AB 1836

(Maienschein)

Peace officers: mental health

Would, upon appropriation of funds, establish the Officer Wellness and Mental Health Grant Program within the Board of State and Community Corrections for the purpose of improving officer wellness and expanding mental health resources and suicide prevention. The bill would require the board to award grants to eligible local law enforcement agencies and local peace officer associations. The bill would require program funds to be used for one or more specified purposes, including the establishment of officer wellness and peer support units and the hiring and retention of licensed mental health professionals.

 6/22/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR with recommendation: To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 4. Noes 0.) (June 21). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

AB 1942

(Muratsuchi)

Community colleges: funding: instructional service agreements with public safety agencies.

Current law provides for a formula for the calculation of general purpose apportionments of state funds to community colleges. Current law provides a separate formula for the allocation of apportionments of state funds to community colleges, which uses the numbers of full-time equivalent students as its basis, for use for apportionments for noncredit instruction and instruction in career development and college preparation. This bill would require instruction provided by community college districts under instructional service agreements with public safety agencies, as defined, to be funded under the apportionment formula used for instruction in career development and college preparation.

6/22/2022-VOTE: Do pass as amended, but first amend, and re-refer to the Committee on [Appropriations]

AB 1946

(Boerner Horvath)

Electric bicycles: safety and training program

The Protected Bikeways Act of 2014, provides that the state’s bicycle programs have not been fully developed or funded. Current law establishes the Department of the California Highway Patrol within the Transportation Agency. This bill would require the department to develop, on or before September 1, 2023, statewide safety standards and training programs based on evidence-based practices for users of electric bicycles, as defined, including, but not limited to, general electric bicycle riding safety, emergency maneuver skills, rules of the road, and laws pertaining to electronic bicycles.

6/15/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR with recommendation: To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 15. Noes 0.) (June 14). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

AB 1947

(Ting)

Hate crimes: law enforcement policies

Current law requires state law enforcement agencies to adopt a framework or other formal policy created by POST regarding hate crimes. Current law requires any local law enforcement agency that adopts or updates a hate crime policy to include specified information in that policy, including information on bias motivation. Current law requires the Department of Justice to collect specified information relative to hate crimes and to post that information on its internet website. This bill would require each local law enforcement agency to adopt a hate crimes policy. The bill would require those policies to, among other things, include instructions on considering the relevance of specific dates and phrases when recognizing whether an incident is a hate crime, to include a supplemental suspected hate crime form. The bill would require every state and local agency to use specified definitions for the term “protected characteristics.” The bill would require each law enforcement agency to report their hate crime policy to the Department of Justice, as specified, and to update their policy before specified deadlines and otherwise as directed by the department. The bill would require the department to post information regarding the compliance and noncompliance of agencies that are required to provide information relative to hate crimes to the department, by specified dates, and as required by future updates. The bill would require POST to develop a model hate crime policy, as specified.

6/22/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 4. Noes 0.) (June 21). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

AB 1996

(Cooley)

 State government: administrative regulations: review

The Administrative Procedure Act, in part, authorizes various state entities to adopt, amend, or repeal regulations for various specified purposes. These rulemaking provisions of the act require the Office of Administrative Law and the state agency proposing to adopt, amend, or repeal a regulation to review the proposed changes for, among other things, consistency with current state regulations. Current law requires the office to initiate a priority review of existing regulations when requested by a committee of the Legislature, as specified. This bill would require each state agency to, on or before January 1, 2026, review that agency’s regulations, identify any regulations that are duplicative, overlapping, inconsistent, or out of date, to revise those identified regulations, as provided, and report to the Legislature and Governor, as specified. The bill would repeal these provisions on January 1, 2027.

5/20/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(8). (Last location was A. APPR. SUSPENSE FILE on 4/27/2022)

AB 1988

(Bauer-Kahan)

 

Warren-911-Emergency Assistance Act and Miles Hall-988-Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Current federal law, the National Suicide Hotline Designation Act of 2020, designates the 3-digit telephone number “988” as the universal number within the United States for the purpose of the national suicide prevention and mental health crisis hotline system operating through the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline maintained by the Assistant Secretary for Mental Health and Substance Abuse and the Veterans Crisis Line maintained by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs. This bill would change the name of the Warren-911-Emergency Assistance Act to the Warren-911-Emergency Assistance Act and Miles Hall-988-Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

5/27/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(11). (Last location was INACTIVE FILE on 3/17/2022)

AB 1997

(Gipson)

California State University: emergency response programs: report.

Current law authorizes the rustees of the California State University to appoint one or more persons to constitute a police department for the headquarters and for each campus of the California State University. This bill would require the Chancellor of the California State University, on or before July 1, 2023, to convene a stakeholder workgroup that includes a representative from specified stakeholders, including faculty, staff, and students. The bill would require the stakeholder workgroup, at a minimum, to evaluate and report on alternative options to current emergency response programs on the campuses of the California State University and alternative dispute resolution options to resolve employee conflicts. The bill would require the stakeholder workgroup to submit a report to the Legislature on or before October 1, 2023, that includes recommendations to alleviate concerns of current emergency response programs on the campuses of the California State University. The bill would repeal these provisions on July 1, 2027.

6/22/2022-VOTE: Do pass as amended, but first amend, and re-refer to the Committee on [Appropriations]

AB 2043

(Jones-Sawyer)

Bail Bonds

Current law prohibits an insurer from executing an undertaking of bail except by and through a person holding a bail license, as specified. Current law provides for the issuance of bail licenses under the jurisdiction of the Insurance Commissioner. Under current law, bail licenses include bail agent licenses, bail permittee licenses, and bail solicitor licenses. Current law requires the commissioner to charge and collect specified fees for an application for a new or renewed bail license by a bail agent, bail permittee, or bail solicitor. This bill would, commencing July 1, 2023, include bail fugitive recovery agent licenses in the list of bail licenses and would prohibit a person from performing the activities of a bail fugitive recovery agent unless the person holds a license, as specified. The bill would exempt an individual holding a bail agent’s, bail permittee’s, or bail solicitor’s license from a bail fugitive recovery agent’s licensing requirements.

6/23/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on PUB. S. (Ayes 7. Noes 2.) (June 22). Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.

AB 2062

(Salas)

Local law enforcement hiring grants

Would, upon appropriation of funds for this purpose in the annual Budget Act and until January 1, 2029, require the Board of State and Community Corrections to establish a grant program to provide $50,000,000 in grants to local law enforcement agencies to incentivize peace officers to work in local law enforcement agencies that are in underserved communities and to live in the communities that they are serving. The bill would require grant funds to be used to provide a 5-year supplement to peace officer salaries in local law enforcement agencies that are in underserved communities that have had a homicide rate higher than the state average for the past 5 years or more and where the peace officer lives within 5 miles of the office in which they work. The bill would require local law enforcement agencies that receive grants to report specified information to the board annually and would require the board to report to the Legislature and the Governor’s office on the efficacy of the program, as prescribed, on or before July 1, 2028.

5/20/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(8). (Last location was A. APPR. SUSPENSE FILE on 4/27/2022)

AB 2229

(Rivas)

Peace officers: minimum standards: bias evaluation. 

Current law requires peace officers in this state to meet specified minimum standards, including, among other requirements, that peace officers be evaluated by a physician and surgeon or psychologist and found to be free from any physical, emotional, or mental condition that might adversely affect the exercise of the powers of a peace officer. This bill would require that evaluation to include bias against race or ethnicity, gender, nationality, religion, disability, or sexual orientation.

6/2/2022-Read second time. Ordered to third reading.

AB 2285

(Smith)

Peace officer reports: stops

Current law requires each state and local agency that employs peace officers to annually report to the Attorney General data on all stops conducted by the agency’s peace officers, and requires that data to include specified information, including the time, date, and location of the stop, and the reason for the stop. Current law defines a "stop" for that purpose as any detention by a peace officer of a person, or any peace officer interaction with a person in which the peace officer conducts a search, including a consensual search, of the person’s body or property in the person’s possession or control. This bill contains other existing laws.

5/6/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(6). (Last location was A. PUB. S. on 3/3/2022)

AB 2333

(Smith)

Hate crimes: peace officers.

Current law defines "hate crime" as a criminal act committed, in whole or in part, because of actual or perceived characteristics of the victim, including, among other things, race, religion, disability, and sexual orientation. Under existing law, that definition applies unless an explicit provision of law or the context clearly requires a different meaning. Current law provides punishments for hate crimes that range from misdemeanors with specified penalties to felonies with additional terms of one to 3 years in state prison, depending on the underlying criminal act and other circumstances. Current law requires, with conditions, the Attorney General to direct local law enforcement agencies to report specified information relative to hate crimes to the Department of Justice. Local law enforcement entities are required by existing law to provide a brochure on hate crimes to victims of these crimes and to the public, and the Department of Fair Employment and Housing is required by existing law to revise those brochures as needed and to provide those brochures to local law enforcement agencies upon request. This bill would add status as a peace officer to the list of actual or perceived characteristics necessary to determine whether a criminal act qualifies as a hate crime.

4/29/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(5). (Last location was PUB. S. on 3/3/2022)

AB  2429

(Quirk)

 

 

Commission on Peace Officers Standards and Training: assessment of training requirements

The Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training is responsible for developing and implementing programs to increase the effectiveness of law enforcement. The commission is required to adopt rules establishing minimum standards relating to physical, mental, and moral fitness governing the recruitment of specified peace officers. This bill would require the commission to perform specified duties, including, among other things, partnering with academic researchers to conduct an assessment of existing officer training requirements and determining how well the existing officer training requirements are working for officers in the field. The bill would require the commission to report its findings to the Legislature by January 1, 2025.

6/22/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR with recommendation: To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 11. Noes 0.) (June 21). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

AB 2537

(Gipson)

 

Vehicles: driver education.

Would require the Department of Justice, in conjunction with the Department of Motor Vehicles and the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training, to develop and create a video demonstrating the proper conduct by a peace officer and an individual during a traffic stop and to post the video on its internet website.

6/15/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on PUB. S. with recommendation: To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 15. Noes 0.) (June 14). Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.

AB 2547

(Nazarian)

Peace officers: determination of bias

Current law requires each law enforcement agency to be responsible for completing investigations of allegations of serious misconduct of a peace officer. This bill would require the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) to establish a definition of “biased conduct,” as specified, and would require law enforcement agencies to use that definition in any investigation into a bias-related complaint or an incident that involves possible indications of officer bias. The bill would also require POST to develop guidance for local law enforcement departments on performing effective Internet and social media screenings of officer applicants.

6/16/2022-Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S. From committee chair, with author's amendments: Amend, and re-refer to committee. Read second time, amended, and re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.

AB 2557

(Bonta)

Peace officers: records

Would make records and information obtained from records maintained by an agency or body established by a city, county, city and county, local government entity, state agency, or state department for the purpose of civilian oversight of peace officers subject to disclosure pursuant to the California Public Records Act. The bill would require those records to be redacted only as specified. By increasing duties on local entities, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.

4/29/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(5). (Last location was JUD. on 4/19/2022)

AB 2583

(Mullin)

 

 Peace officers: training

Current law requires Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) to require field training officers who are instructors for the field training program to have at least 8 hours of crisis intervention behavioral health training to better train new peace officers on how to effectively interact with persons with mental illness or intellectual disability. This bill would require the commission to revise that training to include instruction on how to effectively interact with persons with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. The bill would specify that a field training officer who completed the training prior to January 1, 2025, or who is exempt from completing the training, is not required to take the updated training, but would require a field training officer who has not completed the training on or after January 1, 2025, or who is not exempt from completing the training, to complete the revised training.

5/20/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(8). (Last location was A. APPR. SUSPENSE FILE on 4/27/2022)

AB 2644

(Holden)

Custodial interrogation

Existing law authorizes a peace officer to take a minor into temporary custody when that officer has reasonable cause to believe that the minor has committed a crime or violated an order of the juvenile court. In these circumstances, existing law requires the peace officer to advise the minor that anything the minor says can be used against the minor, that the minor has the right to remain silent, that the minor has the right to have counsel present during any interrogation, and that the minor has the right to have counsel appointed if the minor is unable to afford counsel. Existing law requires that a youth 17 years of age or younger consult with legal counsel in person, by telephone, or by video conference prior to a custodial interrogation and before waiving any of the above-specified rights. This bill would prohibit law enforcement officers from employing threats, physical harm, deception, or psychologically manipulative interrogation tactics, as specified, during an interrogation of a person 25 years of age or younger. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

6/15/2022-From committee chair, with author's amendments: Amend, and re-refer to committee. Read second time, amended, and re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.

AB 2773

(Holden)

Stops: notification by peace officers.​

 Current law requires each state and local agency that employs peace officers to annually report to the Attorney General data on all stops conducted by the agency’s peace officers, and requires that data to include specified information, including the time, date, and location of the stop, and the reason for the stop. This bill would require each state and local agency to include in its annual report the reason given to the person stopped at the time of the stop.

6/22/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on TRANS. (Ayes 4. Noes 0.) (June 21). Re-referred to Com. on TRANS.

SB 57

(Wiener)

 Controlled substances: overdose prevention program

Would, until January 1, 2028, authorize the City and County of San Francisco, the County of Los Angeles, the City of Los Angeles, and the City of Oakland to approve entities to operate overdose prevention programs for persons that satisfy specified requirements, including, among other things, providing a hygienic space supervised by trained staff where people who use drugs can consume preobtained drugs, providing sterile consumption supplies, providing access or referrals to substance use disorder treatment, and that program staff be authorized and trained to provide emergency administration of an opioid antagonist, as defined by existing law. The bill would require the City and County of San Francisco, the County of Los Angeles, the City of Los Angeles, and the City of Oakland, prior to authorizing an overdose prevention program in its jurisdiction, to provide local law enforcement officials, local public health officials, and the public with an opportunity to comment in a public meeting. The bill would require an entity operating a program to provide an annual report to the city or the city and county, as specified. The bill would require all local jurisdictions that choose to participate in the overdose prevention program to confer and choose a single independent entity, as specified, to conduct a peer-reviewed study, funded by the participating jurisdictions, of the statewide efficacy of the overdose prevention programs and the community impacts of the programs, to be submitted to the Legislature and the Governor’s office on or before January 15, 2027.

6/2/2022-Read second time. Ordered to third reading.

SB 731

(Durazo)

Criminal records: relief.

Current law requires the Commission on Teacher Credentialing to appoint a Committee of Credentials and requires allegations of acts or omissions for which adverse action may be taken against applicants or holders of teaching or services credentials to be reported to the committee, including conviction for a controlled substance offense, as defined. Current law requires the commission to deny an application for the issuance of a credential or the renewal of a credential who has been convicted of a controlled substance offense. This bill would prohibit the record of a conviction for possession of specified controlled substances that is more than 5 years old and for which relief was granted from being presented to the committee or from being used to deny a credential. This bill would make this relief available to a defendant who has been convicted of a felony, as long as that conviction does not require registration as a sex offender.

 6/23/2022-Read third time and amended. (Ayes 42. Noes 16.) Ordered to third reading.

SB 882 

(Eggman)

Advisory Council on Improving Interactions between People with Intellectual and Development Disabilities and Law Enforcement.  

Would create the Advisory Council on Improving Interactions between People with Intellectual and Development Disabilities and Law Enforcement, under the Department of Justice, to, among other things, evaluate existing training for peace officers specific to interactions between law enforcement and individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The bill would require the council to be composed of 9 members, appointed by the Governor, Senate Committee on Rules, and Speaker of the Assembly, including an individual with an intellectual or developmental disability and a representative from a law enforcement organization. The bill would require the council to meet quarterly beginning July 1, 2023, and would require the council to submit a report including recommendations to the Legislature for improving outcomes of interactions with both individuals who have an intellectual or developmental disability and mental health conditions, as specified.

6/14/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. with recommendation: To consent calendar. (Ayes 7. Noes 0.) (June 14). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

SB 960

(Skinner)

Public employment: peace officers: citizenship

Current law establishes the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training within the Department of Justice to perform various functions involving the training of peace officers. Current law requires peace officers in this state to meet specified minimum standards, including, among other requirements, being at least 18 years of age, being of good moral character, as determined by a thorough background investigation, and being either a citizen of the United States or a permanent resident who is eligible for and has applied for citizenship, except as prescribed. This bill would provide that those standards shall be interpreted and applied consistent with federal law and regulations, as specified. The bill would remove the provision that requires peace officers to either be a citizen of the United States or be a permanent resident who is eligible for and has applied for citizenship, and would instead require peace officers be legally authorized to work in the United States, and make conforming changes.

6/23/2022-Read second time. Ordered to third reading.

SB 1000

(Becker)

Law enforcement agencies: radio communications​

Current law establishes the California Law Enforcement Telecommunications System (CLETS) to make specified criminal justice databases, including individual criminal histories, wanted and missing persons, and stolen firearms, vehicles, and property, available to participating law enforcement agencies. Current law prohibits unauthorized access to CLETS and the unlawful use of CLETS information by authorized users. Existing law authorizes the Attorney General to adopt policies, procedures, and practices related to the use of CLETS. These rules require a participating agency to restrict access to CLETS and define “access” as the ability to see or hear any information obtained from CLETS. This bill would require a law enforcement agency, including the California Highway Patrol, municipal police departments, county sheriff’s departments, specified local law enforcement agencies, and specified university and college police departments, to, by no later than January 1, 2024, ensure public access to the radio communications of that agency, as specified.

6/21/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 5. Noes 2.) (June 21). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

SB 1038

(Bradford)

 Law enforcement: facial recognition and other biometric surveillance

Current law, until January 1, 2023, prohibits a law enforcement agency or law enforcement officer from installing, activating, or using any biometric surveillance system in connection with an officer camera or data collected by an officer camera. Current law allows a person to bring an action for equitable or declaratory relief against a law enforcement agency or officer who violates this prohibition. This bill would extend these provisions indefinitely.

5/27/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(11). (Last location was S. INACTIVE FILE on 5/27/2022)

SB 1088

(Bradford)

Public employment: law enforcement labor relations

The Public Safety Officers Procedural Bill of Rights Act grants a variety of employment rights and protections to public safety officers, as defined, including with respect to investigations, interrogations, and disciplinary procedures. This bill would prohibit a procedural violation of the act deemed to be without substantive effect, as specified, from being the basis for reversing or modifying discipline of a public safety officer.

5/27/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(11). (Last location was S. INACTIVE FILE on 5/27/2022)

SB 1129

(Jones)

Felony murder: resentencing: peace officer victims

Current law authorizes a person who has been convicted of felony murder or murder under the natural and probable consequences theory or other theory under which malice is imputed to a person based solely on that person’s participation in a crime to file a petition for the court to vacate the person’s sentence and resentence them if the petitioner could not presently be convicted of murder or attempted murder because of changes made in the law since their conviction. This bill would specify that these provisions do not apply to a person when the victim is a peace officer who was killed while engaged in the performance of their duties and when the defendant knew, or reasonably should have known, that the victim was a peace officer engaged in the performance of their duties.

4/29/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(5). (Last location was PUB. S. on 2/23/2022)

SB 1359

(Hueso)

Vehicles: registration

Current law prohibits a person from driving, moving, or leaving standing upon a highway, or in an offstreet public parking facility, any motor vehicle, trailer, semitrailer, pole or pipe dolly, or logging dolly, unless it is registered and the appropriate fees have been paid, except as specified. Current law requires current month and year tabs indicating the month and year expiration of a vehicle’s registration to be attached to the rear license plate assigned to the vehicle for the last preceding registration year in which the licensed plates were issued. This bill would require a law enforcement officer to verify, using available Department of Motor Vehicles’ records, that no current registration exists for a vehicle before issuing a citation for a violation of the requirement to attach the appropriate tabs. The bill would prohibit the issuance of a citation against a vehicle in violation of that requirement that has a current registration on file with the department.

6/21/2022-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 6. Noes 0.) (June 21). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

SB 1389

(Bradford)

Vehicles: traffic stops

Would prohibit a peace officer from initiating a motor vehicle stop for a low-level infraction, unless there is separate, independent basis to initiate the stop. The bill would define “low-level infraction” for this purpose as a violation related to vehicle registration and equipment or the operation of a bicycle, a violation pertaining to the secure fastening of a license plate to the vehicle, and a violation for lighting equipment not illuminating, as specified. The bill would exclude from “low-level infractions” vehicle registrations that have expired for more than 6 months and violations relating to commercial vehicles.

5/27/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(11). (Last location was S. INACTIVE FILE on 5/27/2022)

SB 1416

(Eggman)

Mental health services: gravely disabled persons.

The Lanterman-Petris-Short Act provides for the involuntary commitment and treatment of a person who is a danger to themselves or others or who is gravely disabled. Current law also provides for a conservator of the person or estate to be appointed for a person who is gravely disabled. Current law, for the purposes of involuntary commitment and conservatorship, defines “gravely disabled,” among other things, as a condition in which a person, as a result of a mental health disorder, is unable to provide for the basic personal needs of food, clothing, or shelter. This bill would also include under the definition of “gravely disabled” a condition in which a person, as a result of a mental health disorder, is unable to provide for the basic personal needs of medical care or self protection and safety, as specified.

6/22/2022-Coauthors revised. From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on JUD. (Ayes 15. Noes 0.) (June 21). Re-referred to Com. on JUD.

SB 1418

(Newman)

Public safety collaborative

Current law charges the Board of State and Community Corrections with providing the statewide leadership, coordination, and technical assistance to promote effective state and local efforts and partnerships in California’s adult and juvenile criminal justice system. This bill would create the Public Safety Collaborative Fund in the State Treasury. The bill would require the board, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to administer public safety collaborative grants from the fund to regional public safety collaboratives established for violence prevention, intervention, and suppression activities. The bill would require a collaborative applying for a grant to establish a coordinating and advisory board with membership, including city officials, local law enforcement, and local stakeholders, to prioritize the use of the funds. The bill would authorize grant funds to be utilized for a range of programs, services, and activities designed to reduce violence, including programs to address youth violence prevention and intervention in K–12 schools and homeless outreach and intervention efforts.

6/15/2022-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

SB 1464

(Pan)

 Law enforcement: public health orders.

Current law requires all sheriffs to execute all lawful orders of a department in their counties. Current law authorizes each sheriff to enforce all orders of the State Department of Public Health or of the local health officer issued for the purpose of preventing the spread of any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease. Current law authorizes each peace officer of every political subdivision of the county to enforce within the area subject to their jurisdiction all orders of the State Department of Public Health or of the local health officer issued for the purpose of preventing the spread of any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease. This bill would instead require those sheriffs and peace officers to enforce those orders. By expanding the duties of local law enforcement, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.

4/29/2022-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(b)(5). (Last location was HEALTH on 3/9/2022)
*Legend Information on legislative terms / definitions on the California Assembly Chief Clerk's Website