Publicationsbreadcrumb separatorMonthly Reportsbreadcrumb separatorJune 2021 Report

POST Monthly Report

June 2021

Keeping you up to date on POST projects

Command College Class 66 Graduation

On June 4, 2021, POST Command College Class 66 graduated from the 14-month program designed to prepare law enforcement leaders of today for the challenges of the future. The primary goal of the Command College is to provide sitting law enforcement leaders a course with a focus on futures forecasting and innovation. Students are exposed to leaders in the field of forecasting, innovation, economics, media relations, political science, and organizational leadership from across the nation. The program is presented at a master’s degree level, based on student-centered adult learning theories, placing accountability and responsibility for success on the student. Please join us in congratulating Command College Class 66 on this significant achievement.

Visit Command College on the POST Website for additional information regarding the program. Questions may also be directed to Law Enforcement Consultant Rob Patton, Training Program Services Bureau, at (916) 227-4829.

Command College Class 66 Graduation

Perishable Skills Program Update – Use of Force

On February 24, 2021, the Commission voted to approve the addition of four hours to the Perishable Skills Program specific to the requirement for Use of Force training. This received formal approval through the Administrative Procedure Act’s rulemaking process on June 15, 2021 and became effective immediately. Please refer to Bulletin 2021-23 for further details, including the required minimum topics, course objectives, and sample expanded course outline.

Questions regarding this update may be directed to Staff Services Manager Michelle Weiler, Training Delivery and Compliance Bureau, at (916) 227-4870 or your Regional Consultant.

POST Wins 2021 Emmy Award for Officer Wellness Awareness Video

POST and its video production vendor, Digital Outpost, received an Emmy Award for the Did You Know? Silent No More officer wellness awareness video at the June 2021 National Association of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS) regional awards competition. The video won in the “Branded Content” category. 

Originally released in June 2020, the Did You Know? Silent No More video reveals internal issues plaguing many officers as they serve their communities. Through this video’s portrayal of a “routine” day, viewers see many factors affecting officers’ well-being and are encouraged to be proactive and outspoken about law enforcement suicide and mental health. The highly impactful video encourages law enforcement officers to seek assistance if necessary, help raise awareness, and support others who may be struggling with physical or psychological wellness. The video is available to view on the POST Website or on the POST Learning Portal.

Digital Outpost in Carlsbad and POST have produced more than two dozen Did You Know? videos over the years, many of which have won previous Emmy awards.

Questions regarding the recent Emmy award and the Did You Know? Silent No More video may be directed to Senior Law Enforcement Consultant Mike Barnes, Learning Technology Resources Bureau, at (916) 227-3454.

POST Hosts Recruit Training Officer (RTO) Course in Folsom

On June 22-25, 2021, the POST Basic Training Bureau facilitated a 24-hour Recruit Training Officer (RTO) Course for Basic Course Presenters. POST Regulation requires all full-time RTOs to complete this course within one year of their appointment to their respective academies.

The RTO Course was facilitated in Folsom, CA and included instruction on the roles and responsibilities of the RTOs, legislative mandates, Commission Regulations and Commission Procedures, testing protocols and remedial training requirements, liability and ethics, communication, counseling and evaluations, physical training requirements, and special training issues.

If you are interested in more information, please contact Law Enforcement Consultant Carrie Hollar, Basic Training Bureau, at (916) 227-4661.

Attendees sitting in a banquet hall for a RTO Course in Folsom, CA Attendees standing in a banquet hall for an exercise for a RTO Course in Folsom, CA

POST Hosts Executive Development Course Curriculum Update Workshop

In May, the Executive Development Course (EDC) hosted a two-day curriculum update workshop. The EDC is the last in a series of professional development programs offered by POST and is intended to enhance the leadership potential and capabilities of law enforcement executives. The course is 80-hours, conducted in two separate one-week sessions.

Completion of the EDC is a requirement for a department head to receive their POST Executive Certificate as mandated in Commission Regulation 1011. The EDC addresses a broad range of contemporary topics, issues, and trends relevant to the law enforcement executive. The purpose of the workshop was to reimagine course curriculum that resonates with executives. In other words, the desired outcome was to inspire law enforcement leaders to think creatively so they can effectively lead their agencies and communities.

Visit the Executive Development Course on the POST Website for additional information regarding the program. Questions may also be directed to Law Enforcement Consultant Rob Patton, Training Program Services Bureau, at (916) 227-4829.

Facilitators and POST Staff at the Executive Development Course

Update on Assembly Bill 846 Project: Bias Screening of Peace Officer Candidates

In June, POST began Phase 2 of the Assembly Bill 846 (AB 846) Project, stakeholder input. The first group of stakeholders, the Psychological Evaluator Advisory Group, met on June 23rd to review the recommendations for incorporating the identification of bias in the peace officer screening process, as required by Government Code Section 1031.3 (AB 846). Participants were provided the draft Bias Assessment Framework, recommended guidance materials, and proposed regulation changes for their review and input.

The meeting yielded positive feedback on the proposed recommendations and participants offered meaningful considerations for future stakeholders. The psychological evaluators were asked to conduct a further review of the recommendations, provide additional input, and assist with identifying specific background and personal history areas relevant to screening for bias in the psychological evaluation. After additional input is received, changes will be made, if/as necessary and presented to the next stakeholder group of background investigators and law enforcement representatives.

POST is continuing to identify interested stakeholders for Phase 2 of the Project. Bulletin 2021-22, provided an overview of the project, including descriptions of the three phases and a call out for interested stakeholders. Those who are interested in participating in a stakeholder group and/or providing constructive feedback on the recommendations are encouraged to complete the AB 846 Stakeholder Interest Survey. We will continue seeking interested stakeholder input through July and August with the anticipation of concluding Phase 2 by September.

Questions regarding the AB 846 Project can be directed to Melani Singley, Strategic Communications and Research Bureau, at (916) 227-4258

POST Conducts Basic Course Certification Review in Bakersfield

On June 8-10, 2021, the POST Basic Training Bureau conducted a Basic Course Certification Review (BCCR) of the Bakersfield Law Enforcement Training Academy.

The BCCR is an in-depth review of Basic Course presenters regarding the certification of their courses. The BCCR ensures the quality, integrity, and safety of entry-level peace officer training in California. POST ensures all certified Basic Course presenters are in compliance with Penal and Government Codes related to POST, the California Code of Regulations (Title 11, Division 2), Commission Procedures and the Training and Testing Specifications.  

For questions regarding the BCCR process, please contact Staff Services Manager Bill Lewis, Basic Training Bureau, at (916) 227-4856.

A sign of Bakersfield Police Department Law Enforcement Training Facility Attendees inside a training facility

Principled Policing: Procedural Justice, Implicit Bias and Legitimacy Train-the-Trainer Course Workshop Audit

On May 24-26, 2021, the Training Program Services Bureau audited the Norther California Regional Public Safety Training Authority (NCRPSTA) presentation of the post-certified, Principled Policing: Procedural Justice, Implicit Bias and Legitimacy Train-the-Trainer Course.

The three-day workshop was attended by 22 public safety personnel and convened at the NCRPSTA headquarters. The first day of training provided a meta-analysis of the research methodology validating the 8-hour course. This included assessment of the course design, cognitive scaffolding, and sequencing of the curriculum four tenets: (1) voice, (2) decision neutrality, (3) respect and dignity, and (4) trustworthiness. This was followed by 16 hours of students instructionally facilitating and modeling of the curriculum. Students were assessed based on their knowledge, skills, and ability to instructionally facilitate the curriculum learning goals and objectives. Law enforcement can improve trust and relationships between law enforcement agencies and their communities, by using these tenets to evaluate their policies, procedures, and training within their departments.

Questions regarding the course content may be directed to Senior Consultant Charles Evans, Training Program Services Bureau, at (916) 215-4432.

POST Learning Portal Home Page Redesign

The POST Learning Portal has been redesigned as part of a series of new updates. the new design is easier to use and makes commonly used areas more accessible. The Portal Spotlight and New to the Portal have been moved to the top along with the catalog. Assigned training is also now prominently placed and accessible from the home page. Further communication will be sent out as more updates to the learning portal are rolled out.

For Learning Portal technical support, please contact the help desk.

POST Presents Director/Coordinator Course in Garden Grove

During the week of June 15-18, 2021, the POST Basic Training Bureau presented a POST certified 24-hour Director/Coordinator Course for state and local law enforcement basic course presenters. Twenty-six students attended the course. This regular Basic Course training is a mandated course of instruction to be completed within one year of appointment to an academy for directors and coordinators.

The Director/Coordinator Course was facilitated in Garden Grove, CA and included instruction on Academy Management (roles and responsibilities), POST Regulations and Training Procedures, Instructional Design, Instructional Planning, Quality and Resources, Electronic Data Interchange (EDI), Testing and Remedial Training Requirements, Liabilities and Legal Issues, Legislative Mandates, Risk Management and Academy Safety Protocols, and the POST Basic Course Certification Review (BCCR) process. This course of training provides an opportunity for law enforcement personnel across the state to meet with POST staff and network with each other. The next Director/Coordinator Workshop is tentatively scheduled for the month of November 2021 in Folsom, CA.

If you are interested in more information, please contact Senior Consultant Kirk Bunch, Basic Training bureau, at (916) 227-3896.

Attendees sitting in a banquet hall for the Director/Coordinator Course in Garden Grove, CA

POST Attends Museum of Tolerance Training

On April 15-16, 2021, the Training Program Services Bureau attended the Simon Wiesenthal Center, Museum of Tolerance (MOT) presentation of the Sherman Block Supervisory Leadership Institute (SBSLI), Session 6A. The two-day,16-hour training is conducted during the 6th month of SBSLI’s 8-month (192 hour) Institute. Although Session 6A typically convenes at MOT headquarters, located at Simon Wiesenthal Plaza, the live, in-person class of 24 students met at the Sonesta Los Angeles Airport Hotel, pending the phased reopening of the MOT, due to COVID.

Session 6A introduces and contextualizes the historical and contemporary nexus between diversity, social justice, and leadership. Themes include: Scapegoating, Proactive and Reactive Mindsets, Valuing Others, Groupthink, Self-Rationalization, Advocating Dissent, Nature of Fear, and Responsibility and Accountability.

Questions regarding the course content may be directed to Senior ConsultantCharles Evans, Training Program Services Bureau, at (916) 215-4432.

Meet the New POST Employees

Lynette Harper
Staff Services Analyst  
Strategic Communications and Research Bureau

Lynette Harper

Lynette comes to us from Sacramento State University’s Civil Engineering Department. She served as an Administrative Support Assistant in the Engineering and Computer Science College as an assistant to the Department Chair. Prior to CSUS, Lynette was the Project Manager/Event Coordinator for Evening of Dreams, an annual special needs prom, and she worked for Capital Christian Center in various administration and analyst capacities for community events. Lynette is assigned as a Staff Services Analyst in the Strategic Communications and Research Bureau.

Legislative Update

Status of Current Legislation

The following is legislation POST is monitoring in the 2021-22 session. This is not a complete list of legislation that could affect law enforcement.  (Updated 6/28/2021)

Bill # and Author Title and Summary Status of Bill

AB 17

Assembly Member Cooper

Peace officers: disqualification from employment

Would disqualify a person from being a peace officer if the person has been discharged from the military for committing an offense that would have been a felony if committed in California or if the person has been certified as a peace officer and has had that certification revoked by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training.

Amended: 1/12/2021

Status: 4/30/2021-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(a)(2). (Last location was PUB. S. on 1/11/2021)(May be acted upon Jan 2022)

AB 26

Assembly Member Holden

Peace officers: use of force

Current law requires each law enforcement agency, on or before January 1, 2021, to maintain a policy that provides a minimum standard on the use of force. Current law requires that policy, among other things, to require that officers report potential excessive force to a superior officer when present and observing another officer using force that the officer believes to be unnecessary, and to require that officers intercede when present and observing another officer using force that is clearly beyond that which is necessary, as specified. This bill would require those law enforcement policies to require those officers to immediately report potential excessive force, as defined.

Amended Date: 5/27/2021

Status: 6/9/2021-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.

AB 48

Assembly Member Gonzalez, Lorena

Law enforcement: kinetic energy projectiles and chemical agents

Would prohibit the use of kinetic energy projectiles or chemical agents by any law enforcement agency to disperse any assembly, protest, or demonstration, except in compliance with specified standards set by the bill, and would prohibit their use solely due to a violation of an imposed curfew, verbal threat, or noncompliance with a law enforcement directive. The bill would include in the standards for the use of kinetic energy projectiles and chemical agents to disperse gatherings the requirement that, among other things, those weapons only be used to defend against a threat to life or serious bodily injury to any individual, including a peace officer.

Amended Date: 3/16/2021

Status 6/9/2021-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.

AB 57

Assembly Member Gabriel

Hate crimes

Current law requires any local law enforcement agency that adopts or updates a hate crime policy to include specified information in that policy, including information on bias motivation.This bill would include a statement of legislative findings and declarations and require the basic course curriculum on the topic of hate crimes to be developed in consultation with subject matter experts, as specified, and to include the viewing of a specified video course developed by Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST). The bill would also require POST to make the video available via the online learning portal, and would require all peace officers to complete specified training materials no later than January 1, 2023. The bill would require POST to develop and periodically update an interactive course on hate crimes for in-service peace officers, and require officers to take the course every 6 years.

Amended Date: 5/24/2021

Status: 6/9/2021-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.

AB 60

Assembly Member Salas

Law enforcement

Would disqualify a person from being employed as a peace officer if that person has been convicted of, or has been adjudicated by a military tribunal as having committed an offense that would have been a felony if committed in this state. The bill would also disqualify any person who has been certified as a peace officer by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training and has had that certification revoked by the commission.

Amended Date: 3/16/2021

Status: 4/30/2021-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(a)(2). (Last location was PUB. S. on 1/11/2021)(May be acted upon Jan 2022)

AB 89

Assembly Member Jones-Sawyer

Peace officers: minimum qualifications

Current law requires peace officers in this state to meet specified minimum standards, including age and education requirements. This bill would increase the minimum qualifying age from 18 to 25 years of age. This bill would permit an individual under 25 years of age to qualify for employment as a peace officer if the individual has a bachelor’s or advanced degree from an accredited college or university. The bill would specify that these requirements do not apply to individuals 18 to 24 years of age who are already employed as a peace officer as of the effective date of this act. The bill would provide legislative findings in support of the measure.

Amended Date: 2/17/2021

Status: 6/16/2021-Referred to Coms. on PUB. S. and APPR.

AB 118

Assembly Member Kamlager

Emergency services: community response: grant program

Would, until January 1, 2026, enact the Community Response Initiative to Strengthen Emergency Systems Act or the C.R.I.S.E.S. Act for the purpose of creating, implementing, and evaluating the 3-year C.R.I.S.E.S. Grant Pilot Program, which the act would establish. The bill would require the office to establish rules and regulations for the program with the goal of making grants to community organizations, over 3 years, for the purpose of expanding the participation of community organizations in emergency response for specified vulnerable populations. The bill would require that grantees receive a minimum award of $250,000 per year. The bill would require a community organization receiving funds pursuant to the program to use the grant to stimulate and support involvement in emergency response activities that do not require a law enforcement officer, as specified. The bill would require the Director of Emergency Services (director) to assemble staff and resources to carry out certain duties in support of the program.

Introduced Date: 12/18/2020

Status: 6/9/2021-Referred to Com. on G.O.

AB 481

Assembly Member Chiu

Law enforcement agencies: military equipment: funding, acquisition, and use.      

Would require a law enforcement agency, defined to include specified state and local entities, to obtain approval of the applicable governing body, by adoption of a military equipment use policy, as specified, by ordinance at a regular meeting held pursuant to specified open meeting laws, prior to taking certain actions relating to the funding, acquisition, or use of military equipment, as defined. The bill would also require similar approval for the continued use of military equipment acquired prior to January 1, 2022. The bill would allow the governing body to approve the funding, acquisition, or use of military equipment within its jurisdiction only if it determines that the military equipment meets specified standards.

Amended Date: 5/24/2021

Status: 6/9/2021-Referred to Coms. on PUB. S. and GOV. & F.

AB 490

Assembly Member Gipson

Law enforcement agency policies: arrests: positional asphyxia.      

Would prohibit a law enforcement agency from authorizing techniques or transport methods that involve a substantial risk of positional asphyxia, as defined.By requiring local agencies to amend use of force policies, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

Amended Date: 3/18/2021

Status: 6/16/2021-Referred to Com. on PUB. S

AB 594

Assembly Member McCarty

Law enforcement policies

Current law requires each law enforcement agency to maintain a policy that provides guidelines on the use of force, and to annually furnish specified information to the Department of Justice regarding the use of force by peace officers employed by that agency. Current law requires the Attorney General to investigate incidents of an officer-involved shooting resulting in the death of an unarmed civilian, as specified. deadly use of force incidents other than those required to be investigated by the Attorney General, require an agency to cause a criminal investigation of these incidents to be conducted, and would prohibit a law enforcement agency from having primary responsibility for conducting the criminal investigation into those incidents involving an officer employed by that agency. This bill would instead provide alternative protocols for investigations of those incidents, including investigation by the district attorney’s office, another law enforcement agency, or a multidisciplinary and multiagency task force. The bill would specify that these requirements apply only to a criminal investigation and not to any administrative or disciplinary investigation.

Amended Date: 3/16/2021

Status: 5/25/2021-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(a)(5). (Last location was APPR. SUSPENSE FILE on 4/14/2021)(May be acted upon Jan 2022)

AB 603

Assembly Member McCarty

Law enforcement settlements and judgments: reporting.      

Would require municipalities, as defined, to annually post on their internet websites specified information relating to settlements and judgments resulting from allegations of improper police conduct, including, among other information, amounts paid, broken down by individual settlement and judgment, information on bonds used to finance use of force settlement and judgment payments, and premiums paid for insurance against settlements or judgments resulting from allegations of improper police conduct. The bill would require the Transportation Agency to annually post the same information on its internet website regarding settlements and judgments against the Department of the California Highway Patrol.

Introduced Date: 2/11/2021

Status: 6/22/2021-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 5. Noes 0.) (June 22). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

AB 655

Assembly Member Kalra

California Law Enforcement Accountability Reform Act.      

Current law requires that a candidate for a peace officer position be of good moral character, as determined by a thorough background investigation.This bill would require that background investigation to include an inquiry into whether a candidate for specified peace officer positions has engaged in membership in a hate group, participation in hate group activities, or public expressions of hate, as those terms are defined. The bill would provide that certain findings would disqualify a person from employment.

Amended Date: 3/25/2021

Status: 5/25/2021-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(a)(5). (Last location was APPR. SUSPENSE FILE on 4/28/2021)(May be acted upon Jan 2022)

AB 662

Assembly Member Rodriguez

Mental health: dispatch and response protocols: working group.  

Would require the California Health and Human Services Agency to convene a working group, as specified, no later than July 1, 2022, to examine the existing dispatch and response protocols when providing emergency medical services to an individual who may require evaluation and treatment for a mental health disorder. The bill would require the working group to develop recommendations for improvements to those dispatch and response protocols and recommend amendments to the provisions governing involuntarily taking an individual into temporary custody for a mental health evaluation and treatment. The bill would require the working group to submit periodic reports to the Legislature every 6 months to update the Legislature on its progress, and to submit a final report of its recommendations to the Legislature on or before January 1, 2024.

Amended Date: 4/21/2021

Status: 6/4/2021-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(a)(8). (Last location was INACTIVE FILE on 6/3/2021)(May be acted upon Jan 2022)

AB 669

Assembly Member Lackey

Firearms: unsafe handguns

Current law prohibits the manufacture, importation, sale, or transfer of an unsafe handgun, as defined. Current law exempts from this prohibition sales to specified law enforcement agencies or other specified government agencies for use by specified employees and sales to specified peace officers. Current law further requires that the sale of an unsafe handgun to certain specified entities, including a county probation department, and members of those entities, is only authorized if the handgun is to be used as a service weapon by a peace officer who has successfully completed the basic course prescribed by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) and who qualifies with the handgun, as specified, at least every 6 months. This bill would instead exempt sales to or purchases by a county probation department and sworn members thereof who have completed specified firearms training prescribed by POST.

Introduced Date: 5/6/2021

Status: 6/9/2021-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.

AB 718

Assembly Member Cunningham

Peace officers: investigations of misconduct

Would require a law enforcement agency or oversight agency to complete its investigation into an allegation of the use of force resulting in death or great bodily injury, sexual assault, discharge of a firearm, or dishonesty relating to the reporting, investigation, or prosecution of a crime or misconduct by another peace officer or custodial officer, despite the peace officer’s or custodial officer’s voluntary separation from the employing agency. The bill would require the investigation to result in a finding that the allegation is either sustained, not sustained, unfounded, or exonerated, as defined. The bill would also require an agency other than an officer’s employing agency that conducts an investigation of these allegations to disclose its findings with the employing agency no later than the conclusion of the investigation

Introduced Date: 2/16/2021

Status: 6/15/2021-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR with recommendation: To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 4. Noes 0.) (June 15). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

AB 759

Assembly Member McCarty

Elections: county sheriff

The California Constitution requires the Legislature to provide for an elected county sheriff, elected district attorney, and elected assessor in each county. Current law also provides that the county treasurer, clerk, auditor, tax collector, recorder, public administrator, and coroner are elective offices unless a county makes them appointive offices, as specified. Current law generally requires the election to select county officers to be held with the statewide primary election at which candidates for Governor are nominated, but if no candidate for a county office receives a majority of the votes cast for that office at the primary election, the 2 candidates who received the most votes advance to the statewide general election at which the Governor is elected. This bill would instead require the election to select county officers to be held with the presidential primary and would require, if no candidate receives a majority of the votes cast for the office at the presidential primary, the 2 candidates who received the most votes to advance to the presidential general election. The bill would make these provisions operative on January 1, 2023.

Amended Date: 6/22/2021

Status: 6/22/2021-From committee chair, with author's amendments: Amend, and re-refer to committee. Read second time, amended, and re-referred to Com. on E. & C.A.

AB 931

Assembly Member Villapudua

Peace officer training: duty to intercede.      

Current law requires specified categories of law enforcement officers to meet training standards pursuant to courses of training certified by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training. Current law requires the course or courses of the regular basic course for law enforcement officers to include, among other things, training on the duty to intercede. This bill would require the commission to model that training on the duty to intercede on a specified program, and would require the training to include both classroom instruction and extensive simulator-based training or live scenario-based training.

Amended Date: 5/24/2021

Status: 6/16/2021-Referred to Com. on PUB. S

AB 958

Assembly Member Gipson

Peace officers: law enforcement cliques.

Current laws defines those persons who are peace officers, the entities authorized to appoint them, and the scope of their authority. Current law prescribes certain minimum standards for a person to be appointed as a peace officer, including training requirements, moral character, and physical and mental condition, and certain disqualifying factors for a person to be employed as a peace officer, including a felony conviction. Current law requires a department or agency that employs peace officers to establish a procedure to investigate complaints by members of the public against those officers. This bill would define a law enforcement clique, a group of law enforcement officers within an agency that engages in a pattern of specified unlawful or unethical on-duty behavior, and would require law enforcement agencies to have a policy prohibiting law enforcement cliques and making participation, as specified, in a law enforcement clique grounds for termination.

Amended Date: 5/24/2021

Status: 6/9/2021-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.

SB 2

Senator Bradford

Peace Officers: certification: civil rights

Under current law, the Tom Bane Civil Rights Act, if a person or persons, whether or not acting under color of law, interferes or attempts to interfere, by threats, intimidation, or coercion, with the exercise or enjoyment by any individual or individuals of rights secured by the Constitution or laws of the United States, or of the rights secured by the Constitution or laws of this state, the Attorney General, or any district attorney or city attorney, is authorized to bring a civil action for injunctive and other appropriate equitable relief in the name of the people of the State of California, in order to protect the exercise or enjoyment of the right or rights secured. Current law also authorizes an action brought by the Attorney General, or any district attorney or city attorney, to seek a civil penalty of $25,000. Current law also allows an individual whose exercise or enjoyment of rights has been interfered with to prosecute a civil action for damages on their own behalf. This bill would eliminate certain immunity provisions for peace officers and custodial officers, or public entities employing peace officers or custodial officers sued under the act.

Amended Date: 5/20/2021

Status: 6/3/2021-Referred to Coms. on PUB. S. and JUD.

SB 16

Senator Skinner

Peace officers: release of records

Would make every incident involving force that is unreasonable or excessive, and any sustained finding that an officer failed to intervene against another officer using unreasonable or excessive force, subject to disclosure. The bill would require records relating to sustained findings of unlawful arrests and unlawful searches to be subject to disclosure. The bill would also require the disclosure of records relating to an incident in which a sustained finding was made by any law enforcement agency or oversight agency that a peace officer or custodial officer engaged in conduct involving prejudice or discrimination on the basis of specified protected classes. The bill would make the limitations on delay of disclosure inapplicable until January 1, 2023, for the described records relating to incidents that occurred before January 1, 2022.

Amended Date: 5/20/2021

Status: 6/10/2021-Referred to Coms. on PUB. S. and JUD.

SB 98

Senator McGuire

Public Peace: media access

Would, if peace officers close the immediate area surrounding any emergency field command post or establish any other command post, police line, or rolling closure at a demonstration, march, protest, or rally where individuals are engaged primarily in constitutionally protected activity, as described, require that a duly authorized representative of any news service, online news service, newspaper, or radio or television station or network, as described, be allowed to enter those closed areas, with authorization from a commanding officer on scene, and would prohibit a peace officer or other law enforcement officer from intentionally assaulting, interfering with, or obstructing a duly authorized representative who is gathering, receiving, or processing information for communication to the public.

Amended Date: 6/17/2021

Status: 6/17/2021-From committee with author's amendments. Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.

SB 271

Senator Wiener

County sheriffs: eligibility requirements

The California Constitution requires the Legislature to provide for an elected county sheriff in each county. Current statutory law specifies that a person is not eligible to become a candidate for the office of sheriff in a county unless the person has an advanced certificate issued by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training or meets a combination of certain educational degree and full-time, salaried law enforcement experience requirements, as specified. Current law deems a person holding the office of sheriff on January 1, 1989, to have met those qualifications. This bill would repeal those eligibility provisions, and would make other conforming changes

Introduced Date: 1/28/2021

Status: 5/7/2021-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(a)(3). (Last location was GOV. & F. on 3/16/2021)(May be acted upon Jan 2021)

SB 387

Senator Portantino

Peace officers: certification, education, and recruitment

Current law requires the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training to establish a certification program for peace officers. Current law requires the commission to establish basic, intermediate, advanced, supervisory, management, and executive certificates for the purpose of fostering the education and experience necessary to perform general police service duties. Existing law requires certificates to be awarded on the basis of a combination of training, education, experience, and other prerequisites, as determined by the commission. This bill would require the commission to work with stakeholders from law enforcement, the University of California, the California State University, the California Community Colleges, and community organizations to develop a list of courses to include as requirements for obtaining a basic certificate, as specified. The bill would require an applicant for a basic certificate to complete those courses before obtaining the certificate.

Amended Date: 5/20/2021

Status: 6/4/2021-Failed Deadline pursuant to Rule 61(a)(8). (Last location was INACTIVE FILE on 5/28/2021)(May be acted upon Jan 2022)

SB 494

Senator Dodd

Law enforcement: training.

Current law requires the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training to develop guidelines and implement courses of instruction regarding racial profiling, domestic violence, hate crimes, vehicle pursuits, and human trafficking, among others. Current law establishes the Robert Presley Institute of Criminal Investigation which provides training courses for criminal investigators, including core instruction on matters common to all investigative activities and specialty courses in various investigative specialities. This bill would require the commission, by January 1, 2023, to implement a course of instruction for the regular and periodic training of law enforcement officers in the use of ethical human engagement and advanced interpersonal communication skills. The bill would require the course to be incorporated into the course or courses of basic training for law enforcement officers.

Amended Date: 6/16/2021

Status: 6/16/2021-Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.

The POST Monthly Report is a monthly status report that informs POST Commissioners and the California law enforcement community of recent progress on POST projects and instructional programs under development, and other information of importance to our mission to continually enhance the professionalism of California law enforcement.

©2020 Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training | 860 Stillwater Road, Suite 100, West Sacramento, CA 95605
To subscribe to email alerts for POST Monthly Report, please subscribe here.